Why Linux

Most PC users will be familiar with Microsoft Windows, some with Apple OS X. But what about Linux?

Linux has become popular as a server OS, but couldn’t win any desktop battle, yet. One of the reasons for Linux’ failure in the desktop market is its fragmentation. There is no Linux operating system, but dozens of different (competing) distributions, as these different flavors of Linux are called. “You got lots of choices” would the Linux aficionado explain.

While the software landscape under Linux has greatly improved, Microsoft is still the king when it comes to commercial software. And the fact that the vast majority of desktops run Windows practically guarantees that hardware will be compatible with Windows, which is not always true for Linux.

So why on earth should a Microsoft Windows user bother with Linux? Continue reading “Why Linux”

Running Windows 10 on Linux using KVM with VGA Passthrough

The Need

You want to use Linux as your main operating system, but still need Windows for certain applications unavailable under Linux. You need top notch (3D) graphics performance under Windows that you can’t get from VirtualBox or similar virtualization solutions. And you do not want to dual-boot into Linux or Windows. In that case read on.

Many modern CPUs have built-in features that improve the performance of virtual machines (VM), up to the point where virtualized systems are indistinguishable from non-virtualized systems. This allows us to create virtual machines on a Linux host platform without compromising performance of the (Windows) guest system. Continue reading “Running Windows 10 on Linux using KVM with VGA Passthrough”